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Shop the Prints

Here you can browse and purchase limited-edition art prints created by Endangered Species Print Project artists. We donate a portion of every print to wildlife conservation.

Whooping Crane Print

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sold out

Whooping Crane Print

40.00
The whooping crane has a 7 - 8 foot wingspan and stands up to 5 feet tall making it the tallest flying bird in North America.

This is an 8" x 10" archival inkjet print on bamboo paper. 

SPECIES: WHOOPING CRANE

  • Wild Pop./Print Edition: 398
  • Population In Captivity: 148
  • Threatened by: Loss of wintering habitat in the US due to development (farms, homes etc), Collisions with power lines during migration
  • Scientific NameGrus americana
  • Habitat: once much larger, but now limited to nesting in Wood Buffalo National Park in Alberta, Canada with wintering mostly along the Gulf Coast

ARTIST: JENNY KENDLER

This print was inspired by the two traits of the Indri that I found most compelling and magical, the Indri's "sun-worshiping" behavior, and their hauntingly alluring calls. The face of the larger Indri seems almost cartoonish and exaggerated, but it is directly inspired by a photograph. What an amazing expression!

Jenny Kendler is an interdisciplinary artist, environmental activist, naturalist & wild forager who lives in Chicago. She is currently the first Artist-in-Residence with Natural Resources Defense Council (NRDC), her work explores human beings' complex relationships with the natural world.


CONSERVATION: OPERATION MIGRATION

Operation Migration has played a lead role in the reintroduction of endangered Whooping cranes into eastern North America. Operation Migration pilots used ultralight aircraft and play the role of surrogate parents to guide captive-hatched and imprinted Whooping cranes along a planned migration route.

 

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