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Shop the Prints

Here you can browse and purchase limited-edition art prints created by Endangered Species Print Project artists. We donate a portion of every print to wildlife conservation.

Staghorn Coral Print

StaghornWeb.jpg
StaghornWeb.jpg

Staghorn Coral Print

40.00

This is an 8" x 10" archival inkjet print on bamboo paper. 

click image to enlarge and view full print

ArtistRenee Robbins

  • Wild Species/Print Edition: 368
  • Population In Captivity: unknown
  • Threatened by: Rise in sea temperature associated with climate change.  The resulting coral bleaching leaves corals vulnerable to disease. Pollution.
  • Scientific Name: Acropora cervicornis
  • Habitat: Tropical reef environments (to a depth of 30 meters)
  • Your purchase of this print will support: The Coral Reef Alliance
  • Learn more about the staghorn coral
While The Endangered Species Print Project is proud to support the work of the Coral Reef Alliance (CORAL), we are not directly affiliated with them or any of their programs, projects, or websites.
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Notes from the artist, Renee Robbins:
The Staghorn Coral is like an icon of the coral reef; it’s fast growing, hardy, and adaptable. However, since 1980, up to 95% of the Staghorn Coral have died off. In 2006 this species was added to the endangered species list. The decline of the species is primarily due to disease caused by extreme temperatures. My painting depicts a healthy specimen growing out of a multi-colored form, which I see as a human-made electronic hybrid. The hybrid is like a complex ecosystem comprised of many parts such as microscopic algae, fish patterns, and ship portals. The combination of the two forms in the painting relates to collaborative effort necessary between nature and humans to save our coral reefs.